Ultimus: Aiming to “industrialise” process digitisation

RESEARCH REPORT // PREMIUM
 
From its initial focus on workflow, Ultimus broadened out to offer a broad process automation suite, the Ultimus Adaptive BPM Suite – and in 2016, Ultimus introduced its Composed Process Solutions (CPS) offering. The CPS platform is an application generator framework that sits atop other Ultimus products and enables trained “composers” to very rapidly build collections of workflow applications using a ‘mass customisation’ approach.

Top takeaways

Ultimus: shifting from tools provider to “factory operator”

Ultimus, Inc. was formed in 1994. Today, the company has more than 2,000 customers, and around 300 employees based in 6 continents.

From its initial focus on workflow, Ultimus broadened out to offer a broad process automation suite, the Ultimus Adaptive BPM Suite. In 2016, Ultimus introduced its Composed Process Solutions (CPS) offering: this sits atop Ultimus’ Adaptive BPM Suite and Advanced Task Service and enables trained “composers” to very rapidly build collections of workflow applications using a ‘mass customisation’ approach.

The introduction of CPS has also driven an important shift in Ultimus’ sales approach. Now, rather than selling a generic process automation platform to IT personnel, Ultimus and its partners sell targeted application propositions to business teams leaders and to CIOs charged with digital transformation. And unusually, it sells by working one-to-one with prospects to create working prototypes (‘custom demos’) based on their requirements – at no charge, within a one-week window.

Investigate Ultimus if you have varied ‘long tail’ digitisation needs

Ultimus doesn’t have the big marketing budgets associated with some of its larger competitors, but it does have over 20 years’ market experience. In that period, it has focused particularly on building a global footprint, and its multi-lingual tools make it an attractive proposition for multinational organisations and organisations outside North America and Western Europe that don’t want to compromise on localisation. Its foundation Adaptive BPM Suite has some real strengths, and lives up to the ‘Adaptive’ label.

Now, with CPS, Ultimus has an offering that should appeal to any organisation that wants to rapidly digitise families of ‘long-tail’ business processes. If you want to build such applications yourself with citizen technologists, CPS might not be a good fit; but if you are interested in having a technology-based ‘process factory’ deliver you completed applications very quickly, CPS is a compelling proposition.

Ultimus: from process automation tools provider to “factory operator”

Ultimus, Inc. was formed in 1994 as a vendor of workflow technology for the Microsoft platform (it’s a Microsoft Gold certified partner). Today, the company has more than 2,000 customers, and around 300 employees based in 6 continents. It has four major sales offices: in Europe its principal presence is near Munich, Germany.

In 2011, the company’s management bought out its venture backer and since then the company has been employee-owned. Ultimus is cash-positive and debt-free, but does not disclose revenue figures.

From its initial focus on workflow, Ultimus broadened out to offer a broad process automation suite, the Ultimus Adaptive BPM Suite. In 2016, Ultimus introduced its Composed Process Solutions (CPS) offering. The CPS platform is an application generator framework that sits atop other Ultimus products and enables trained “composers” to very rapidly build collections of workflow applications using a ‘mass customisation’ approach.

The introduction of CPS has also driven an important shift in Ultimus’ sales approach. Now, rather than selling a generic process automation platform to IT personnel, Ultimus and its partners sell targeted application propositions to business teams. And unusually, they work one-to-one with prospects to create working prototypes (‘custom demos’) based on their requirements – at no charge, within a one-week window.


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RESEARCH REPORT // PREMIUM

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